Increasing Innovation through Application Retirement

Posted by David Storey | Jun 20, 2017

Did you know that the typical enterprise has over 500 applications ?  Do you know whether all the applications in your company are actively been used and how much value they are delivering to the business ?

It has been widely accepted that a large proportion of any IT budget is used to simply run the existing application portfolio. Each application maintained by an organisation will take a share of that budget to provide physical infrastructure, software license & maintenance fees in addition to the normally hidden costs of skilled support staff.

It therefore becomes clear that ensuring we understand each applications position in its lifecycle and retiring those that no longer deliver sufficient business value is a valuable way to free up IT budget for Innovation. Many Application Lifecycle Management ( ALM ) models fail to include a retirement step and while a future based on DevOps will change ALM going forward we also need to deal with the legacy of the past.

But why is there any need to focus on Application Retirement (Application Decommissioning), it will surely happen naturally?

Well, we have all heard the stories of the server that no one dares touch just in case there is a business user out there who might one day need access to the data held by the long ago replaced application on that server.  Whether true or not there is a natural fear of shutting down something which might still be needed. The approach of powering down servers and waiting for someone to complain is not a viable strategy for managing business data which needs to be retained.

In addition, many projects that implement new business apps will have focused on the delivery of the benefits the new functionality brings and overlooked the value that retiring the application it replaces could also deliver.

As a result, there is now a backlog of applications in most organisations that could be retired if a suitable solution was available to provide access to data at a cost which matched the low business value and infrequency of access.  That solution is here today and is based on the Cloud.

So, how can Cloud help me with Application Retirement?

As many organisations move to implement apps in the Cloud whether using Software (Saas), Platform (Paas) or Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) there is a corresponding increase in the number of existing applications which are candidates for retirement. An Application Retirement Service in the Cloud provides a cost effective, secure and reliable method for data storage from retired applications in an easily accessible form. Using a best practice methodology to assess applications and their data retention and access requirements the solution can be tailored to maximise the savings on hardware, software licenses and support fees. At the same time this frees up valuable skilled resources to focus on innovative new business applications and less on maintenance and operations.

Depending on the business requirements data can be stored in the Cloud in its original form and volume, at reduced volumes following an archive & purge process or following a transformation to a format suited to future ad hoc access. When not being accessed the costs are associated largely with the data volumes being held and not infrequently used compute/server resources.

How can we help?

At Redfaire we would be delighted to bring our many years of experience with packaged applications , including Oracle JD Edwards and Oracle E-Business Suite , and providing Consulting & Managed Services to our client base in order to help you create an Application Retirement strategy. If you would like to discuss the potential benefits of Application Retirement further please contact me at dstorey@redfaire.com

Did you know, the typical enterprise has over 500 applications?
Do you know whether all the Applications in your company are actively being used and how much value they are delivering to the business ?

It has been widely accepted that a large proportion of any IT budget is used to simply run the existing application portfolio. Each application maintained by an organisation will take a share of that budget to provide physical infrastructure, software licenses & maintenance fees in addition to the normally hidden costs of skilled support staff.


It, therefore, becomes clear,  that ensuring we understand each application's position in its lifecycle and retiring those that no longer deliver sufficient business value is a valuable way to free up IT budget for Innovation. Many Application Lifecycle Management
( ALM ) models fail to include a retirement step and while a future based on DevOps will change ALM going forward we also need to deal with the legacy of the past.

- See more at: http://www.redfaire.com/blog/2016/11/07/increasing-your-budget-for-business-innovation-through-application-retirement/#sthash.pepuMymx.dpuf

Did you know, the typical enterprise has over 500 applications?
Do you know whether all the Applications in your company are actively being used and how much value they are delivering to the business ?

It has been widely accepted that a large proportion of any IT budget is used to simply run the existing application portfolio. Each application maintained by an organisation will take a share of that budget to provide physical infrastructure, software licenses & maintenance fees in addition to the normally hidden costs of skilled support staff.


It, therefore, becomes clear,  that ensuring we understand each application's position in its lifecycle and retiring those that no longer deliver sufficient business value is a valuable way to free up IT budget for Innovation. Many Application Lifecycle Management
( ALM ) models fail to include a retirement step and while a future based on DevOps will change ALM going forward we also need to deal with the legacy of the past.


But why is there any need to focus on Application Retirement, it will surely happen naturally ?

Well, we have all heard the stories of the server that no one dares touch just in case there is a business user out there who might one day need access to the data held by the long ago replaced application on that server. Whether true or not, there is a natural fear of shutting down something which might still be needed. The approach of powering down servers and waiting for someone to complain is not a viable strategy for managing business data which needs to be retained.

In addition, many projects that implement new business applications will have focused on the delivery of the benefits the new functionality brings and overlooked the value that retiring the application it replaces could also deliver.  As a result, there is now a backlog of applications in most organisations that could be retired if a suitable solution was available to provide access to data at a cost which matched the low business value and infrequency of access. That solution is here today and is based on the Cloud.

- See more at: http://www.redfaire.com/blog/2016/11/07/increasing-your-budget-for-business-innovation-through-application-retirement/#sthash.pepuMymx.dpuf

Did you know, the typical enterprise has over 500 applications?
Do you know whether all the Applications in your company are actively being used and how much value they are delivering to the business ?

It has been widely accepted that a large proportion of any IT budget is used to simply run the existing application portfolio. Each application maintained by an organisation will take a share of that budget to provide physical infrastructure, software licenses & maintenance fees in addition to the normally hidden costs of skilled support staff.


It, therefore, becomes clear,  that ensuring we understand each application's position in its lifecycle and retiring those that no longer deliver sufficient business value is a valuable way to free up IT budget for Innovation. Many Application Lifecycle Management
( ALM ) models fail to include a retirement step and while a future based on DevOps will change ALM going forward we also need to deal with the legacy of the past.


But why is there any need to focus on Application Retirement, it will surely happen naturally ?

Well, we have all heard the stories of the server that no one dares touch just in case there is a business user out there who might one day need access to the data held by the long ago replaced application on that server. Whether true or not, there is a natural fear of shutting down something which might still be needed. The approach of powering down servers and waiting for someone to complain is not a viable strategy for managing business data which needs to be retained.

In addition, many projects that implement new business applications will have focused on the delivery of the benefits the new functionality brings and overlooked the value that retiring the application it replaces could also deliver.  As a result, there is now a backlog of applications in most organisations that could be retired if a suitable solution was available to provide access to data at a cost which matched the low business value and infrequency of access. That solution is here today and is based on the Cloud.

- See more at: http://www.redfaire.com/blog/2016/11/07/increasing-your-budget-for-business-innovation-through-application-retirement/#sthash.pepuMymx.dpuf

Did you know, the typical enterprise has over 500 applications?
Do you know whether all the Applications in your company are actively being used and how much value they are delivering to the business ?

It has been widely accepted that a large proportion of any IT budget is used to simply run the existing application portfolio. Each application maintained by an organisation will take a share of that budget to provide physical infrastructure, software licenses & maintenance fees in addition to the normally hidden costs of skilled support staff.


It, therefore, becomes clear,  that ensuring we understand each application's position in its lifecycle and retiring those that no longer deliver sufficient business value is a valuable way to free up IT budget for Innovation. Many Application Lifecycle Management
( ALM ) models fail to include a retirement step and while a future based on DevOps will change ALM going forward we also need to deal with the legacy of the past.


But why is there any need to focus on Application Retirement, it will surely happen naturally ?

Well, we have all heard the stories of the server that no one dares touch just in case there is a business user out there who might one day need access to the data held by the long ago replaced application on that server. Whether true or not, there is a natural fear of shutting down something which might still be needed. The approach of powering down servers and waiting for someone to complain is not a viable strategy for managing business data which needs to be retained.

In addition, many projects that implement new business applications will have focused on the delivery of the benefits the new functionality brings and overlooked the value that retiring the application it replaces could also deliver.  As a result, there is now a backlog of applications in most organisations that could be retired if a suitable solution was available to provide access to data at a cost which matched the low business value and infrequency of access. That solution is here today and is based on the Cloud.

- See more at: http://www.redfaire.com/blog/2016/11/07/increasing-your-budget-for-business-innovation-through-application-retirement/#sthash.pepuMymx.dpuf



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